U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Divider Arrow National Institutes of Health Divider Arrow NCATS

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Showing 102021 - 102030 of 107353 results

Status:
US Previously Marketed
First approved in 1986
Source:
NOROXIN by Kyorin Pharmaceutical
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ACHIRAL)



Norfloxacin is an antibacterial agent, It inhibits inhibits DNA synthesis by inhibiting DNA gyrase enzyme. Norfloxacin was approved in 1986 for treatment of urinary tract infections, gynecological infections, prostatitis, gonorhhea and bladder infections. In ophtalmology, norfloxacin is used for treatment of conjunctivitus.
Status:
US Previously Marketed
First approved in 1986

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (RACEMIC)


Conditions:

Pirbuterol (trade name Maxair) is a short-acting β2 adrenoreceptor agonist with bronchodilating action used in the treatment of asthma. The pharmacologic effects of beta-adrenergic agonist drugs, including pirbuterol, are at least in proof attributable to stimulation through beta-adrenergic receptors of intracellular adenyl cyclase, the enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP). Increased c-AMP levels are associated with relaxation of bronchial smooth muscle and inhibition of release of mediators of immediate hypersensitivity from cells, especially from mast cells. Pirbuterol is used in asthma for reversal of acute bronchospasm, and also as a maintenance medication to prevent future attacks. It should be used in patients 12 years of age and older with or without concurrent theophylline and/or inhaled corticosteroid. After inhalation of doses up to 800 μg (twice the maximum recommended dose) systemic blood levels of pirbuterol are below the limit of assay sensitivity (2–5 ng/ml). A mean of 51% of the dose is recovered in urine as pirbuterol plus its sulfate conjugate following administration by aerosol. Pirbuterol is not metabolized by catechol-O-methyltransferase.
Status:
US Previously Marketed
First approved in 1986

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (RACEMIC)


Conditions:

Pirbuterol (trade name Maxair) is a short-acting β2 adrenoreceptor agonist with bronchodilating action used in the treatment of asthma. The pharmacologic effects of beta-adrenergic agonist drugs, including pirbuterol, are at least in proof attributable to stimulation through beta-adrenergic receptors of intracellular adenyl cyclase, the enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP). Increased c-AMP levels are associated with relaxation of bronchial smooth muscle and inhibition of release of mediators of immediate hypersensitivity from cells, especially from mast cells. Pirbuterol is used in asthma for reversal of acute bronchospasm, and also as a maintenance medication to prevent future attacks. It should be used in patients 12 years of age and older with or without concurrent theophylline and/or inhaled corticosteroid. After inhalation of doses up to 800 μg (twice the maximum recommended dose) systemic blood levels of pirbuterol are below the limit of assay sensitivity (2–5 ng/ml). A mean of 51% of the dose is recovered in urine as pirbuterol plus its sulfate conjugate following administration by aerosol. Pirbuterol is not metabolized by catechol-O-methyltransferase.
Status:
US Previously Marketed
First approved in 1986
Source:
NOROXIN by Kyorin Pharmaceutical
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ACHIRAL)



Norfloxacin is an antibacterial agent, It inhibits inhibits DNA synthesis by inhibiting DNA gyrase enzyme. Norfloxacin was approved in 1986 for treatment of urinary tract infections, gynecological infections, prostatitis, gonorhhea and bladder infections. In ophtalmology, norfloxacin is used for treatment of conjunctivitus.
Status:
US Previously Marketed
Source:
Enkaid by Bristol
(1986)
Source URL:
First approved in 1986
Source:
Enkaid by Bristol
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (RACEMIC)



Encainide is an antiarrhythmic drug, developed by Bristol Myers Co supplied 25 and 35 mg capsules for oral administration. Encainide is no longer used because of its frequent proarrhythmic side effects. The mechanisms of the antiarrhythmic effects of Enkaid are unknown but probably are the result of its ability to slow conduction, reduce membrane responsiveness, inhibit automaticity, and increase the ratio of the effective refractory period to action potential duration. Enkaid produces a differentially greater effect on the ischemic zone as compared with normal cells in the myocardium. This could result in the elimination of the disparity in the electrophysiologic properties between these two zones and eliminate pathways of abnormal impulse conduction, development of boundary currents and/or sites of abnormal impulse generation. The absorption of Enkaid after oral administration is nearly complete with peak plasma levels present 30 to 90 minutes after dosing. There are two major genetically determined patterns of encainide metabolism. In over 90% of patients, the drug is rapidly and extensively metabolized with an elimination half-life of 1 to 2 hours. These patients convert encainide to two active metabolites, O-demethylencainide (ODE) and 3-methoxy-O-demethylencainide (MODE), that are more active (on a per mg basis) than encainide itself. In less than 10% of patients, metabolism of encainide is slower and the estimated encainide elimination half-life is 6 to 11 hours. Slow metabolism of encainide is associated with a diminished ability to metabolize debrisoquin. Enkaid should be administered only after appropriate clinical assessment and the dosage of Enkaid must be individualized for each patient on the basis of therapeutic response and tolerance. The recommended initial dosing schedule for adults is one 25 mg Enkaid capsule t.i.d. at approximately 8-hour intervals.
Status:
US Previously Marketed
First approved in 1985
Source:
Suprol by Ortho
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (RACEMIC)



Suprafen is a dual inhibitor of COX-1 and COX-2, which was used for the inhibition of intraoperative miosis. Suprafen was marketed under the name Profenal, however, it is no longer available in the USA.
Status:
US Previously Marketed
First approved in 1985
Source:
Moctanin by Thistle, J.L.
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (RACEMIC)

Conditions:

Glyceryl 1-caprylate (Monooctanoin, Capmul 8210), a semisynthetic esterified glycerol, a cholesterol solvent, that has been used for the dissolution of retained cholesterol gallstones following cholecystectomy. Bile duct infusion of monooctanoin is associated with little toxicity, although potentially serious problems can result from absorption of the drug or tissue infiltration. Gastrointestinal side effects such as anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain have been reported most commonly. Complete gallstone dissolution has occurred in approximately 50-75 percent of patients receiving monooctanoin. Although mechanical stone removal is still considered to be the treatment of choice for retained gallstones, monooctanoin use appeared promising for stone dissolution in patients in whom mechanical removal has been unsuccessful or is impossible. Monoctanoin was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Oct 29, 1985. It was developed and marketed as Moctanin® by ETHITEK in US.
Ioxaglate Sodium Meglumine (trade name Hexabrix) is a new low osmolality ionic contrast agent, that used as a diagnostic radiopaque medium. Following intravascular injection, Ioxaglate Sodium Meglumine is rapidly transported through the circulatory system to the kidneys and is excreted unchanged in the urine. The joint spaces as well as the uterus and fallopian tubes may be visualized by the direct injection of the contrast medium into the region to be studied. The usual adult dose for left coronary arteriography is 8 mL (range 2-14 mL) and for right coronary arteriography is 5 mL (range 1-10 mL). The doses may be repeated as necessary Patients may have clinically insignificant ECG changes during the procedure. The following adverse effects have occurred in conjunction with the administration of iodinated intravascular contrast agents for this procedure: hypotension, shock, anginal pain, myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmias (bradycardia, ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation) and cardiac arrest.
Status:
US Previously Marketed
First approved in 1985
Source:
Suprol by Ortho
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)



Suprafen is a dual inhibitor of COX-1 and COX-2, which was used for the inhibition of intraoperative miosis. Suprafen was marketed under the name Profenal, however, it is no longer available in the USA.
Ioxaglate Sodium Meglumine (trade name Hexabrix) is a new low osmolality ionic contrast agent, that used as a diagnostic radiopaque medium. Following intravascular injection, Ioxaglate Sodium Meglumine is rapidly transported through the circulatory system to the kidneys and is excreted unchanged in the urine. The joint spaces as well as the uterus and fallopian tubes may be visualized by the direct injection of the contrast medium into the region to be studied. The usual adult dose for left coronary arteriography is 8 mL (range 2-14 mL) and for right coronary arteriography is 5 mL (range 1-10 mL). The doses may be repeated as necessary Patients may have clinically insignificant ECG changes during the procedure. The following adverse effects have occurred in conjunction with the administration of iodinated intravascular contrast agents for this procedure: hypotension, shock, anginal pain, myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmias (bradycardia, ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation) and cardiac arrest.

Showing 102021 - 102030 of 107353 results