U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Divider Arrow National Institutes of Health Divider Arrow NCATS

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Showing 21 - 30 of 6981 results

Status:
Investigational
Source:
INN:cicloprofen
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (RACEMIC)

Status:
Investigational
Source:
INN:drocinonide
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)

Status:
Investigational
Source:
INN:PENTOMONE [INN]
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ACHIRAL)

Status:
Investigational
Source:
NCT01391208: Phase 1 Esophageal Adenocarcinoma
(2011)
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ACHIRAL)


Conditions:

Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is widely used to attach a fluorescent label to proteins via the amine group. The isothiocyanate group reacts with amino terminal and primary amines in proteins. It has been used for the labeling of proteins including antibodies and lectins. Isomer I (Fluorescein 5-isothiocyanate) has the thiocyanate group on the 4 carbon of the benzene ring, whereas isomer II (Fluorescein 6-isothiocyanate) has the thiocyanate on the 5 carbon. The two isomers are indistinguishable spectrally, either by wavelength or intensity. Isomer I is more easily isolated in pure form, so is less expensive. This may explain why isomer I is more commonly used for labeling. For many purposes, however, the mixed isomers of FITC will be perfectly suitable. Some FITC conjugates are being investigated for diagnostic purposes. Folate-fluorescein isothiocyanate, or folate-FITC, also identified as EC-17, targets folate receptors over expressed in certain cancers and could help in better identifying the margins of the cancer thereby achieving negative margins.
Status:
Investigational
Source:
INN:picoprazole
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (RACEMIC)

Status:
Investigational
Source:
INN:idremcinal
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)

Status:
Investigational
Source:
INN:phenomorphan
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)

Status:
Investigational
Source:
INN:IPRAGRATINE [INN]
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (RACEMIC)

Status:
Investigational
Source:
INN:MIPRAGOSIDE [INN]
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)

Status:
Investigational
Source:
INN:osanetant
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)



Osanetant (SR-142801) is a NK3 receptor antagonist, it has a higher affinity for human and guinea pig NK3 receptors than for rat NK3 receptors. Osanetant was under development for the treatment of schizophrenia and other Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders. It was developed by Sanofi-Aventis (formerly Sanofi-Synthelabo). Sanofi was originally investigating its potential use as a treatment for psychosis and anxiety. Following phase IIa clinical trials, osanetant entered phase IIb development in February 2001. In a review of its R&D portfolio, the company announced in August 2005 that it would cease any further development of osanetant. This follows an earlier decision to discontinue development of eplivanserin for schizophrenia.